Resources for Team-building

Meeting Facilitators


This is an easy way to welcome the different people in the room, for us to be in touch with their mood, and to help make different connections. We like this activity because it can be done in a group of five or a group of one-hundred (it can be done in any seating arrangement – a circle, large auditorium, etc.).

Topics:

For: ,

Group Size: 10-50+ people

Time: 5-15 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Kinesthetic, Visual


Building a movement isn’t just about carrying out an action. Movement-building is about growing relationships, and growing people’s sense of power. For that, we offer ways to get people more deeply involved. The concept of the ladder of engagement can make sure we are inviting people to make a deeper commitment.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-20 people

Time: 20 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


350 staffer Sarah from Egypt has been using a method called appreciative inquiry. That approach believes that groups make their best progress when they they focus on the skills they do well. When a group says they aren’t good at communication, for example, this approach asks of the group: “Okay, but when you’re the best at communication—what does that look like?” The idea is that seeing what you’re lacking doesn’t help you know what to do more of. Instead focus on what resources you have and how to expand and grow those.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-25 people

Time: 45 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


A group in Fiji was gathering to talk about the possibility of using canoes to stop giant coal shipments from reaching their destination. That action required risk, and risk requires group trust and the willingness to learn and try something new. So facilitators used this tool to start a conversation about how people “maximise” and “minimise” their learning. This highly adaptable tool builds trust and honesty amongst the group and creates a space where people can help each other learn more deeply.

Topics:

For: ,

Group Size: 5-40 people

Time: 20-45 minutes

Learning Styles: Kinesthetic, Reading/Writing, Visual


The goal of this activity is straightforward: getting people to create a timeline of what they have been up to in the last, say, six months. We encourage reflection in small groups so that you get a wide range of input and more chances for participation. Plus, small groups are another way of getting participants to work with each other, especially if you encourage people to get into groups with people they don’t as well or don’t work with as often.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-40 people

Time: 35 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


Organisers


Building a movement isn’t just about carrying out an action. Movement-building is about growing relationships, and growing people’s sense of power. For that, we offer ways to get people more deeply involved. The concept of the ladder of engagement can make sure we are inviting people to make a deeper commitment.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-20 people

Time: 20 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


350 staffer Sarah from Egypt has been using a method called appreciative inquiry. That approach believes that groups make their best progress when they they focus on the skills they do well. When a group says they aren’t good at communication, for example, this approach asks of the group: “Okay, but when you’re the best at communication—what does that look like?” The idea is that seeing what you’re lacking doesn’t help you know what to do more of. Instead focus on what resources you have and how to expand and grow those.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-25 people

Time: 45 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


The goal of this activity is straightforward: getting people to create a timeline of what they have been up to in the last, say, six months. We encourage reflection in small groups so that you get a wide range of input and more chances for participation. Plus, small groups are another way of getting participants to work with each other, especially if you encourage people to get into groups with people they don’t as well or don’t work with as often.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-40 people

Time: 35 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


Trainers


This is an easy way to welcome the different people in the room, for us to be in touch with their mood, and to help make different connections. We like this activity because it can be done in a group of five or a group of one-hundred (it can be done in any seating arrangement – a circle, large auditorium, etc.).

Topics:

For: ,

Group Size: 10-50+ people

Time: 5-15 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Kinesthetic, Visual


Activist groups often develop some actions they use again and again. Sometimes that’s sufficient. Groups can develop internal rituals or find that tactics continue to be effective. But oftentimes groups can get so used to do things that do them even when they’re not effective. So if you know a group who keeps picking the same ineffective tactics, or same boring meetings, this tool can help.

Topics: , ,

For:

Group Size: 5-40 people

Time: 15 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Kinesthetic, Visual


Building a movement isn’t just about carrying out an action. Movement-building is about growing relationships, and growing people’s sense of power. For that, we offer ways to get people more deeply involved. The concept of the ladder of engagement can make sure we are inviting people to make a deeper commitment.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-20 people

Time: 20 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


350 staffer Sarah from Egypt has been using a method called appreciative inquiry. That approach believes that groups make their best progress when they they focus on the skills they do well. When a group says they aren’t good at communication, for example, this approach asks of the group: “Okay, but when you’re the best at communication—what does that look like?” The idea is that seeing what you’re lacking doesn’t help you know what to do more of. Instead focus on what resources you have and how to expand and grow those.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-25 people

Time: 45 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual


A group in Fiji was gathering to talk about the possibility of using canoes to stop giant coal shipments from reaching their destination. That action required risk, and risk requires group trust and the willingness to learn and try something new. So facilitators used this tool to start a conversation about how people “maximise” and “minimise” their learning. This highly adaptable tool builds trust and honesty amongst the group and creates a space where people can help each other learn more deeply.

Topics:

For: ,

Group Size: 5-40 people

Time: 20-45 minutes

Learning Styles: Kinesthetic, Reading/Writing, Visual


The goal of this activity is straightforward: getting people to create a timeline of what they have been up to in the last, say, six months. We encourage reflection in small groups so that you get a wide range of input and more chances for participation. Plus, small groups are another way of getting participants to work with each other, especially if you encourage people to get into groups with people they don’t as well or don’t work with as often.

Topics: , ,

For: , ,

Group Size: 5-40 people

Time: 35 minutes

Learning Styles: Auditory, Reading/Writing, Visual